August 8, 2022

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The View On Cooking

Lancaster restaurants share Vietnamese culture through cuisine

4 min read

VIETNAMESE RESTAURANTS IN LANCASTER COUNTY OR SHARING THEIR CULTURE THROUGH FOOD. FOOD BRINGS EVERYBODY TOGETHER. >> SINCE 26,00 THEY HAVE BEEN FEEDING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE FOOD TO THE COMMUNITY. IN 2016, THE OWNERS OPENED THE SECOND LOCATION. >> MY GRANDFATHER STARTED THE RE STAURANT BUSINESS IN VIETNAM IN THE 1960’S, THEN MY MOM WHEN SHE WAS 19, SHE JUMPED INTO THE BUSINESS AS WELL. SHE SAYS FOOD IS EVERYTHING AND VIETNAMESE CULTURE. THEY HAVE STAYED TRUE TO THEIR MENU UNTIL THIS DAY. >> THE MUEN ITSELF WAS CREATED BY MY MOTHER. MY GRANDFATHER MADE THE RECIPE FOR THE SOUP, THE RECIPE WE STILL USE TODAY. >> FOR A SECOND GENERATION AMERICAN, WORKING AT THE RESTAURANT HAS HELPED THEM TO CONNECTOT HIS ROOTS, AND NOW HE IS TRYING TO TEACH HIS CHILDREN THE SAME. >> MY SON STARTED WORKING WITH US JUST TOEA LRN THE BACKGROUND OF THE BINESUSS AND JUST THE WAY FOOD IS MADE, LEARNING A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HIS CULTURE, AND HOPEFULLY HE WILL SHARE THAT WITH HIS FAMILY AND WITH HIS FRIENDS. >> AND EVERY DAY THEY SHARE A PIECE OF THAT CULTURE WITH CUSTOMERS. >> IT IS GRATIFYING TO SEE PEOPLE EAT OUR FOOD FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FALLING IN LOVE WITH IT. AND THAT IS THE PART LWEOVE THE MOST ABOUT SHARING OUR CUISINE WITH THE WORLD

Lancaster restaurants share Vietnamese culture through food

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.In Lancaster County, we are celebrating some of the culturally diverse cuisines the area has to offer.Vy Banh is one of the owners of Rice & Noodles in Lancaster. She said her family-owned several successful restaurants in the New Orleans area but left after Hurricane Katrina hit.Since 2006, Rice & Noodles has been feeding Lancastrians authentic Vietnamese food. Ten years later, the owners opened a second location called Sprout.”For us, it’s in our blood. I’m a third-generation restaurateur. My grandfather started the restaurant business in Vietnam back in the 60s. And then my mom, when she was 19, she jumped into the business as well,” Banh said. “I’m actually the last grandchild born in Vietnam and to come to the United States, so I was the last child of my generation before my family immigrated to the U.S.”Banh said food is everything in Vietnamese culture, and to this day they have stayed true to their menu by keeping traditional foods and not adding items like French fries to the kids’ menu.Bernard Truong, a manager and one of the owners, said working at the restaurants helps him connect to his roots.As a second-generation American, he is trying to teach his children both cultures.”My son just started working with us just to learn the background of the business and just the way food is made, learning a little bit about his culture and hopefully he’ll share that with his family and with his friends,” Truong said.The owners said they are happy to share a bit of their history with customers through their food.

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

In Lancaster County, we are celebrating some of the culturally diverse cuisines the area has to offer.

Vy Banh is one of the owners of Rice & Noodles in Lancaster. She said her family-owned several successful restaurants in the New Orleans area but left after Hurricane Katrina hit.

Since 2006, Rice & Noodles has been feeding Lancastrians authentic Vietnamese food. Ten years later, the owners opened a second location called Sprout.

“For us, it’s in our blood. I’m a third-generation restaurateur. My grandfather started the restaurant business in Vietnam back in the 60s. And then my mom, when she was 19, she jumped into the business as well,” Banh said. “I’m actually the last grandchild born in Vietnam and to come to the United States, so I was the last child of my generation before my family immigrated to the U.S.”

Banh said food is everything in Vietnamese culture, and to this day they have stayed true to their menu by keeping traditional foods and not adding items like French fries to the kids’ menu.

Bernard Truong, a manager and one of the owners, said working at the restaurants helps him connect to his roots.

As a second-generation American, he is trying to teach his children both cultures.

“My son just started working with us just to learn the background of the business and just the way food is made, learning a little bit about his culture and hopefully he’ll share that with his family and with his friends,” Truong said.

The owners said they are happy to share a bit of their history with customers through their food.

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